Saturday, October 15, 2016

Breakfast
6:30-7:45am

Christian Veterinary Mission Fellowship Breakfast

Judy Batker, DVM, Jessica Gunby, DVM, Sarah Uecker, CVT, Seth Batker and Charlotte Gunby

The impact of veterinary medical work in Haiti: long-term focus in a short-term setting.

7:30am Bakery/Coffee/Milk

 

Small Animal Tracks
8-9 am Radiographic Assessment of the Dyspneic Patient

Andrew Gendler, DVM, DACVR (1.2 CE)

The dyspneic small animal patient often presents a stressful and challenging diagnostic dilemma. Thoracic radiographs are an invaluable part of the diagnostic work-up in these patients. This lecture will delineate a simplified approach of dyspnea localization and review of common imaging findings and diagnostic pitfalls that should allow you to narrow your differential diagnosis list, initiate timely treatment, and decide on the most appropriate next-step diagnostic test.

OR

Anesthesia Monitoring

Thomas K. Day, DVM, MS, DACVAA, DACVECC, CVA (1.2 CE)

Anesthesia monitoring is a standard of care for dogs and cats. This session will describe commonly used anesthesia monitors as well as discussion on normal and abnormal parameters including heart rate, blood pressure and end tidal carbon dioxide.

OR

APHIS Module 9: Interstate and International Health

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • list the various agencies and steps involved in the certification process for Category I animals;
  • find current import/export information for Category I animals traveling interstate or internationally;
  • apply proper completion principles when completing health certificates for Category I animals and avoid making common errors; and
  • explain your roles and responsibilities as an accredited veterinarian as they relate to Category I animal health certificates.
9:10-10:10am Dyspnea Radiology Case Rounds - Interactive Case-Based Session

Andrew Gendler, DVM, DACVR (1.2 CE)

Test out the previously described strategies and radiographic findings in this case-based quiz session. Up to 10 (as time permits) different confirmed cases of patients with dyspnea and their thoracic radiographs will be presented for you to practice your interpretative skills, determine any knowledge gaps, and generate discussion.

OR

Acute Pain Management

Thomas K. Day, DVM, MS, DACVAA, DACVECC, CVA (1.2 CE)

Management of acute pain has become increasingly important in veterinary medicine. This session will discuss monitoring of acute pain with pain scores, management of acute traumatic pain and predicting and managing acute surgical pain.

OR

APHIS Module 11: Sheep and Goats: Disease Awareness and Health Certificates

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • list common diseases of sheep and goats and identify those that are zoonotic;
  • list the four requirements that must be met for USDA to officially recognize a scrapie genotype test;
  • understand the differences in the National Scrapie Eradication Program and the Scrapie Flock Certification Program;
  • explain the types of official identification required for international and interstate movement of sheep and goats; and
  • identify common errors on completed International Health Certificates and Certificates of Veterinary Inspection.
10:10-10:50am Break
10:50-11:50am Abdominal Radiography for the Vomiting Patient: Old techniques revisited

Andrew Gendler, DVM, DACVR (1.2 CE)

Abdominal radiography is the workhorse diagnostic test for the acutely vomiting dog and cat. This lecture reviews pertinent radiographic anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, how gas can be used to improve your radiographic assessment, and radiographic measurements of the GI tract. Additionally, there is a brief discussion of the role of abdominal ultrasound in acutely vomiting patients.

OR

Management of Heatstroke in Dogs

Thomas K. Day, DVM, MS, DACVAA, DACVECC, CVA (1.2 CE)

Many may feel that heatstroke is not a common problem in our state, but it is. This session will discuss the pathophysiology of heatstroke as it pertains to the diagnosis and treatment. Both exertional and environmental heatstroke will be discussed to help provide information that can be passed on the pet owners.

OR

APHIS Module 12: Animal Disease Traceability

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • explain the aspects of ADT to clients and the public,
  • list the official identification devices and methods used for different livestock species,
  • explain why documentation of interstate movement of livestock is necessary for effective traceability,
  • locate the regulations governing the interstate movement of different species of livestock, and
  • describe the responsibilities of an accredited veterinarian with respect to ADT, specifically Title 9 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 86 and Part 161.
11:50-1pm Lunch
Ticket Required
1-2:30pm WVMA Keynote

Scott Zimmer (1.8 CE non-scientific)

Four distinct generations are working together shoulder to shoulder, each with a unique set of attitudes, values and work styles. It used to be that older workers were bosses and younger ones took orders. Now, roles are all over the map and rules are being rewritten. Organizations are feeling the pain of generations as they struggle to manage productivity and morale while maintaining high standards of quality and service in a challenging economy. This program will give you the tools to convert this form of diversity from an obstacle into an opportunity

2:30-2:35pm  Break
2:45-3:45pm Abdominal Radiology Case Rounds- Interactive Case-Based Session

Andrew Gendler, DVM, DACVR (1.2 CE)

Test out the previously described content, strategies, and radiographic findings in this case-based quiz session. Up to 12 (as time permits) different confirmed cases of vomiting patients and their abdominal radiographs will be presented for you to practice your interpretative skills and decide if they should be sent for surgical exploratory or be conservatively managed.

OR

The Critical Respiratory Distressed Cat

Thomas K. Day, DVM, MS, DACVAA, DACVECC, CVA (1.2 CE)

Respiratory distress in cats is an extremely common presentation. This session will describe the history, respiratory patterns and the importance of radiographic interpretation in cats with respiratory distress to differentiate feline lower airway disease (FLAD) from congestive heart failure (CHF) and pleural effusion.

OR

APHIS Module 19: Animal Health Emergency Response

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • identify the various roles and organizations or agencies in which veterinarians may assist in animal health emergency responses;
  • describe the basics of response planning and coordination, including the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS); and
  • locate additional training resources pertaining to animal health emergency response.
3:55-4:55pm Diagnostic Imaging Test Selection - Practical and Evidence-based

Andrew Gendler, DVM, DACVR (1.2 CE)

Organized by body system and/or region, this lecture will review the current literature and my own experiences, to identify the current best-practice recommendations for imaging tests of some of the most common small animal diseases. This discussion will review diagnostic imaging steps that should provide the patient's final diagnosis in a timely manner, while also reducing patient morbidity and client cost. Rather than focusing on the physics or imaging findings of certain advanced imaging modalities, we will instead emphasize and elaborate on a logic-based approach to clinical decision-making and diagnostic imaging test selection/recommendations.

OR

Neurologic Toxicities

Thomas K. Day, DVM, MS, DACVAA, DACVECC, CVA (1.2 CE)

Seizures and tremors are very common signs resulting from exposure to a myriad of neurologic toxins. This session will discuss environmental chemicals, common over-the-counter drugs, prescription drugs and recreational drugs that can present with neurologic signs. Antidotes and supportive care, including seizure management, will be emphasized.

OR

APHIS Module 25: Using Behavior to Assess Animal Welfare

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

After completing this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • identify normal behaviors seen in many animal species under conditions promoting good welfare;
  • describe how sickness behaviors can contribute to improved or compromised animal welfare; and
  • list basic approaches to reducing or eliminating pain and distress in animals.

 

Large Animal Tracks
8-9am Responsible Antimicrobial Use in Cattle

Geoffrey Smith, DVM, PhD (1.2 CE)

The use of drugs to treat animals with disease is a necessary and humane practice in animal production. However, as practitioners, we must have a thorough understanding of how to use drugs both properly and in a legal manner. Antimicrobials are by far the most common class of drug used in bovine practice. In beef cattle, the most common conditions requiring antimicrobial therapy include respiratory disease complex, diarrhea, keratoconjunctivitis and foot rot. In dairy practice the major diseases antibiotics are used for include mastitis, lameness (both digital and interdigital dermatitis), reproductive diseases (ie. metritis) and pneumonia. This session will discuss the principles for responsible and rationale drug use in cattle. Mechanisms of how bacteria acquire antimicrobial resistance will be covered along with how to avoid the development of resistance in food animals. The role of FARAD in preventing drug residues in food animal species will be covered.

OR

APHIS Module 9: Interstate and International Health

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • list the various agencies and steps involved in the certification process for Category I animals;
  • find current import/export information for Category I animals traveling interstate or internationally;
  • apply proper completion principles when completing health certificates for Category I animals and avoid making common errors; and
  • explain your roles and responsibilities as an accredited veterinarian as they relate to Category I animal health certificates.
 9:10-10:10am Prevention of Drug Residues in Cattle

Geoffrey Smith, DVM, PhD (1.2 CE)

This presentation will focus on how to prevent both meat and milk residues in the beef and dairy industries. The primary reasons for residues will be discussed with examples on how to ensure they don't occur. Key questions to be answered during the presentation include 1) why do drug residues occur; 2) what are key issues in avoiding drug residue problems and 3) how do I help educate producers in the proper use of drugs? The role of FARAD in preventing drug residues in food animal species will be covered.

OR

APHIS Module 11: Sheep and Goats: Disease Awareness and Health Certificates

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • list common diseases of sheep and goats and identify those that are zoonotic;
  • list the four requirements that must be met for USDA to officially recognize a scrapie genotype test;
  • understand the differences in the National Scrapie Eradication Program and the Scrapie Flock Certification Program;
  • explain the types of official identification required for international and interstate movement of sheep and goats; and
  • identify common errors on completed International Health Certificates and Certificates of Veterinary Inspection.
10:10-10:50am Break
 10:50-11:50am Nutritional Diseases of Calves

Geoffrey Smith, DVM, PhD (1.2 CE)

The two primary nutritional diseases of dairy calves are abomasal bloat and hypernatremia. Both syndromes are most often related to problems or errors in feeding milk, milk replacer, and/or oral electrolytes to calves. Risk factors include improper mixing of milk replacer or oral electrolyte products, feeding a large volume of milk in a single daily feeding, feeding cold milk (or milk replacer), not offering water to calves, erratic feeding schedules, and failure of passive transfer. During this session we will discuss the relationship between nutrition and disease in dairy calves along with 1) understanding abomasal bloat and what causes it in calves; 2) review treatment and control options for abomasal bloat and 3) review what to do with hypernatremia or salt poisoning in calves.

OR

APHIS Module 12: Animal Disease Traceability

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • explain the aspects of ADT to clients and the public,
  • list the official identification devices and methods used for different livestock species,
  • explain why documentation of interstate movement of livestock is necessary for effective traceability,
  • locate the regulations governing the interstate movement of different species of livestock, and
  • describe the responsibilities of an accredited veterinarian with respect to ADT, specifically Title 9 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 86 and Part 161.
 11:50-1pm Lunch
Ticket Required
 1-2:30pm WVMA Keynote

Scott Zimmer (1.8 CE non-scientific)

Four distinct generations are working together shoulder to shoulder, each with a unique set of attitudes, values and work styles. It used to be that older workers were bosses and younger ones took orders. Now, roles are all over the map and rules are being rewritten. Organizations are feeling the pain of generations as they struggle to manage productivity and morale while maintaining high standards of quality and service in a challenging economy. This program will give you the tools to convert this form of diversity from an obstacle into an opportunity

 2:30-2:45pm  Break
 2:45-3:45pm Managing Cryptosporidia in Calves

Geoffrey Smith, DVM, PhD (1.2 CE)

Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the most commonly isolated gastrointestinal pathogens from dairy calves and immunosuppressed humans and is a significant cause of waterborne diarrhea outbreaks. This presentation will review critical factors for controlling cryptosporidiosis in calves and covers potential options for treatment. Objectives for the presentation include 1) understanding the pathophysiology and diagnosis of Cryptosporidial diarrhea in calves; 2) review treatment and control options for Cryptosporidia; and 3) understanding the public health implications for Cryptosporidia in humans.

OR

APHIS Module 19: Animal Health Emergency Response

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • identify the various roles and organizations or agencies in which veterinarians may assist in animal health emergency responses;
  • describe the basics of response planning and coordination, including the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS); and
  • locate additional training resources pertaining to animal health emergency response.
 3:55-4:55 Ancillary Therapy for Calf Diarrhea

Geoffrey Smith, DVM, PhD (1.2 CE)

Diarrhea is the leading cause of calf mortality prior to weaning in both beef and dairy calves. Therefore both veterinarians and producers should put some effort into designing rationale and efficacious protocols both for the prevention and treatment of diarrhea. This presentation will focus primarily on the use of antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of calf diarrhea. A brief discussion of other ancillary medications will also be included. Key objectives on the presentation include: 1) are feeding antibiotics in the milk effective for diarrhea prevention; 2) should I give antibiotics to a calf with diarrhea - if so when; 3) which antibiotics would be the most effective for calves with diarrhea; and 4) what other treatments are indicated for calf diarrhea?

OR

APHIS Module 25: Using Behavior to Assess Animal Welfare

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

After completing this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • identify normal behaviors seen in many animal species under conditions promoting good welfare;
  • describe how sickness behaviors can contribute to improved or compromised animal welfare; and
  • list basic approaches to reducing or eliminating pain and distress in animals.
logo
4610 S. Biltmore Lane, Suite 107
Madison, WI 53718
Phone: (608) 257-3665
Fax: (608) 257-8989
Email: wvma@wvma.org

WVMA-Foundation-Logo Final