Recent News

The Wisconsin Veterinary Examining Board (VEB) today announced the launch of a Veterinary Professional Assistance Program (VPAP). A partnership between the VEB and Humana, the Program offers personal, confidential guidance, coaching and counseling for all veterinary professionals and their household members. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The WVMA has long advocated for the creation of a VPAP for Wisconsin veterinary professionals. Last session, the WVMA worked with the legislature to pass a statute directing the VEB to create a VPAP. To learn more about the Program, click...

Alan Holter, DVM, of Dodgeville, was appointed to a four-year term on the Wisconsin Veterinary Examining Board (VEB) by Governor Tony Evers. His term will begin January 1, 2021, pending approval by the Legislature. “I am looking forward to this appointment and believe my experience, dedication and knowledge will be an asset on the board,” says Dr. Holter. “I will support the veterinarians and veterinary technicians in this state and the veterinary industry to the best of my ability.” Dr. Holter practices small animal medicine at Dodgeville Veterinary Service. He just completed his three-year presidential term...

By Meghan Lepisto, Publications and Media Relations Manager, University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine As Americans begin pulling up their sleeves for an annual flu vaccine, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have provided new insights into an alternative vaccine approach that provides broader protection against seasonal influenza. In a study published in Cell Reports Medicine in September, scientists describe a T-cell-based vaccine strategy that is effective against multiple strains of influenza virus. The experimental vaccine, administered through the nose, delivered long-lasting, multipronged protection in the lungs of mice by rallying T-cells, specialist white blood cells that quickly eliminate...

By Dr. Julie McGwin, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection This has been an active year for mosquitoes in Wisconsin. Unfortunately, mosquitoes are the vector for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), a viral illness that can affect many different species, including horses and other equines, birds, and humans. As of October 9, 24 laboratory-confirmed equine cases of EEE were identified in Wisconsin, mostly across the northern part of the state. Equine practitioners report many more unconfirmed cases of EEE in their practice areas. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) considers either a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test...

The Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Association (WVMA) has selected Jo-ell Carson as its executive director. “I am eager to connect with the wonderful people of the WVMA,” says Carson. “I have the utmost respect for the veterinary profession and how it influences the well-being of our animals, our lives and our world - reaching from the pets we love to irreplaceable research to the agricultural side that sources our food supply. I am excited to find new ways to evolve and grow this organization to create additional success for our members.” Carson has...

Tom Bach, DVM, assumed the role of president during the WVMA’s annual meeting on October 22. A 1994 graduate of the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Bach works at Lakeview Veterinary Clinic in Madison. His previous involvement with the WVMA includes chairing the Continuing Education Committee. He has also held leadership roles with the Dane County Veterinary Medical Association, beginning shortly after graduating from veterinary school. “After graduation, everyone gets busy starting careers. I have great memories of my early years, forming collegial relationships and friendships with other local veterinarians and having fun actively supporting our profession locally,” says Dr. Bach. “I’m looking forward...

By Chris Barncard, University Communications, University of Wisconsin-Madison Volunteers at four sites in Madison are being tested for the virus that causes COVID-19 by spitting in a vial, which may prove faster, cheaper and less complicated than other common tests, according to University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers. Scientists from UW-Madison’s AIDS Vaccine Research Laboratory (AVRL), a team that in recent years has also turned its attention to COVID-19 and Zika virus outbreaks as need arose, have tuned a relatively simple genetic testing process to find evidence of the novel coronavirus in saliva. With support from a National Institutes of Health grant...

Source: Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection Veterinary Examining Board Reprinted With Permission As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, we are all anxious to return to a normal routine. While we are not there yet, we can continue to work cooperatively to support progress and preserve stability for our employees and our patients. We are seeing an increased number of staff at veterinarian clinics testing positive for COVID-19 or being exposed to a person with the virus. This can have a disastrous impact on a clinic and a community if one ill staff member results in asking...

By Allison Hahn, Communications & Administrative Manager, Wisconsin Livestock Identification Consortium The Wisconsin Livestock Identification Consortium (WLIC) is debuting a video highlighting the importance of animal disease traceability and the use of premises registration and individual animal identification – including the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags – to protect the food supply. The video explains how farm-to-fork traceability starts by tagging animals at the farm of origin through the end of life, and how using this technology provides fast and easy traceback in case of an animal disease outbreak. Viewers will gain perspective...

Mary Geurts of the Randolph Cambria-Friesland FFA Chapter was named the winner of the Wisconsin FFA Veterinary Science Proficiency Award during the State FFA Convention in July. The WVMA sponsored the award. When she first started working at the Randolph Veterinary Clinic, Geurts did a lot of cleaning and organizing in the office. As she got older, her responsibilities grew. She is now able to assemble surgery packs, sterilize equipment and handle animals with ease. She often helps restrain animals for surgery and assists in handling the surgical instruments. It is up to her to keep...

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