Recent News

By the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection Division of Animal Health The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) wants to remind veterinarians of recent rule changes. These include submitting certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs), the process for submitting farm-raised deer samples for chronic wasting disease (CWD) testing and updates for swine testing and movement. Submitting CVIs for Interstate and Intrastate Movement Changes to ATCP 10.06 now only require Wisconsin veterinarians to submit the interstate CVIs they issue for interstate or intrastate movement to DATCP within seven calendar days after issuance. DATCP will now forward those...

The Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Lab (WVDL) has discontinued swine oral fluid testing for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) and swine enteric coronavirus disease (SECD) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) due to the low number of samples received and the high cost of reagents and supplies. Veterinarians are now asked to submit their samples directly to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory or the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. Shipping and submission instructions, testing fees and testing schedules can be found on their websites. In addition, The WVDL is no longer stocking rope-testing kits. Veterinarians and swine owners can order...

The WVMA and Food Armor Foundation were recently awarded grants through the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture Veterinary Services Grant Program (VSGP). The VSGP focuses on two areas: education and rural practice enhancement. The WVMA will use the grant to develop and facilitate the building of a veterinary medical mastermind program. The program will utilize the mastermind concept to provide individual professional development skills in areas such as leadership, business and communication. The goal of the program is to create an environment of shared group learning. The grant awarded to the Food Armor Foundation will...

By Kelly April Tyrrell, University Communications, University of Wisconsin-Madison In an animal model for COVID-19 that shares important features of human disease, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Tokyo and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai show that prior infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus provides protection against reinfection, and treatment with convalescent serum limits virus replication in their lungs. Syrian hamsters, commonly found as pets, have served critical roles in understanding human infectious diseases for decades. The new study, led by Dr. Yoshihiro Kawaoka and published June 22, 2020, in the Proceedings of the National...

Alexis Payette, a University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine student, was elected by her peers to serve a two-year term on the WVMA  Executive Board. A Green Bay, Wisconsin, native, Payette attended UW-Madison as an undergraduate studying biology and psychology. It wasn’t until she realized how integral animal health is to the foundation of societies that Payette decided she wanted to be a veterinarian. “To be honest, when I began college as a psychology major, I did not see how veterinarians could fit into this larger picture of finding solutions to climate change, supporting the growing human population, or something like a global...

By Zachary C. Tooley, WVMA Member and 2LT U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Over the past year, I have learned about the different facets of veterinary medicine and the incredible opportunities available to specialize in a variety of fields. I was also made aware of the opportunity for veterinary students to attend the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Legislative Fly-In. Student AVMA (SAVMA) President Marie Bucko, who is also a mentor and friend, informed me of the opportunity and stressed the importance of being involved in veterinary policy and the direct impact it has on our profession. My interest was piqued. I wanted to attend...

By Kelly Tyrrell, University Communications, University of Wisconsin-Madison In a study published May 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientists in the U.S. and Japan report that in the laboratory, cats can readily become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and may be able to pass the virus to other cats. University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine (UW SVM) Professor of Pathobiological Sciences Dr. Yoshihiro Kawaoka led the study, in which researchers administered SARS-CoV-2 isolated from a human patient to three cats. The following day, the researchers swabbed the nasal passages of the cats...

Kim Brown Pokorny has resigned from her position as Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Association (WVMA) executive director to take on the role of Wisconsin Farm Bureau Federation's chief administrative officer. Brown Pokorny served as WVMA executive director for 12 years, working with veterinarians and veterinary medical industry stakeholders to lead the association. She has worked diligently with legal and legislative counsel to ensure the veterinary medical field is represented, and has continuously encouraged change within the WVMA to keep it relevant and moving forward. In addition, Brown Pokorny was instrumental in the...

By the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection Division of Animal Health With the growing threat of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) is recommending that shelters and rabbit owners review their biosecurity measures to help protect their animals. The disease has not been detected in Wisconsin, but since March it has been found in six states - Arizona, California, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas and Nevada. The strain that has been detected in the United States, Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 2 (RHDV2),...

In October 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released VSG 15201.1, which provides direction to laboratories approved to test samples for Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA). Complete information related to the sampling veterinarian and the tested equine is required for each sample submitted. The most recent version of VS Form 10-11, dated February 2018, is the only VS Form 10-11 that captures all of that information – previous versions can no longer be used. Any other forms, including electronic forms, may be acceptable if they provide all of the required information. For more information on VSG...

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