Recent News

Submitted By Meghan Lepisto, Publications and Media Relations Manager, UW School of Veterinary Medicine Source: U.S. Geological Survey A new study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats, marking a milestone in the international fight against this destructive wildlife disease. “This is a significant step forward in developing control mechanisms to combat the devastating spread of white-nose syndrome in our important bat populations,” said U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Director Jim Reilly. “Being able to deliver an oral vaccine during hibernation could be a game changer in our ability to combat one of the deadliest wildlife...

Dr. Andrew Johnson of Green Bay, Wisconsin, was inducted into the Cattle Production Veterinarian Hall of Fame during the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP) annual conference in St. Louis, Missouri. Known as “The Udder Doctor,” Dr. Johnson is the herd health and wellness veterinarian for Grande Cheese Company and does private consulting on milk quality worldwide. He has written many articles on dairy-related topics for trade journals, veterinary magazines, dairy magazines and newsletters. A graduate of the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Johnson operated his consulting business, Total Herd Management Services, for more than 35 years, consulting...

By Andrea Foley, DVM, Veterinary Technician Program Director and Attending Veterinarian, Madison Area Technical College; and Sabrina Freter, CVT, BAS, Veterinary Technician Instructor, Madison Area Technical College Like many other states, Wisconsin is experiencing a shortage of Certified Veterinary Technicians. Data from Wisconsin TechConnect, a website that matches technical college students with employers, reported more than 135 full-time and over 50 part-time openings between September 2018 and June 2019. To address the problem, Madison Area Technical College (Madison College) developed a part-time, year-round, flexible option for veterinary assistants currently working 20 hours or more per week in a veterinary clinic....

By Jodi Legge, Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Foundation Executive Director To date, donations to the Kindred Companions Memorial Fund total more than $5,300 for the Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Foundation (WVMF)! Through Kindred Companions, veterinary clinics and hospitals can donate to the WVMF in memory of a beloved pet who has passed on. With this nominal donation (minimum of $10 per pet), hospitals and clinics can provide some small comfort to the families who have lost their cherished animal, while also supporting the fundraising initiatives of the Foundation. Upon receiving the donation, the WVMF will send a heartfelt, personalized card conveying sympathy for...

By Amy Horn-Delzer, DVM, Veterinary Program Manager, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection In July, the Associated Press reported that “Midwestern wildlife officials wrapped up what was hailed as an unprecedented conference on chronic wasting disease Thursday without coming up with any new tactics for fighting the stubborn disease.” Why is it that even Wisconsin, a state where officials discovered the disease within its borders 17 years ago, continues to fight the battle of CWD? The disease appears in new areas and at higher frequency in certain areas in both wild and farm-raised cervid each year....

NEWS RELEASE: Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection Contact: Leeann Duwe, Public Information Officer MADISON – Since the outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) started in Asia last year, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) has been working with industry partners to protect the U.S. pork supply. ASF has not been confirmed in North America and aggressive measures across the nation have been implemented to prevent the disease from infecting U.S. swine herds. ASF is not a human health or food safety concern, but it is a highly contagious, viral...

NEWS RELEASE: Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection Contact:  Leeann Duwe, Communication Specialist MADISON – Dr. Darlene Konkle has been appointed Wisconsin State Veterinarian, Secretary-designee Brad Pfaff of the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, announced today. Konkle has been with the department’s Division of Animal Health since 2005, and has served as the acting State Veterinarian since June 2018. She is a native of Freedom, in Outagamie County. “I have been deeply impressed with Dr. Konkle’s work, her knowledge of Wisconsin’s animal agriculture industry, and her broad experience in...

By Peter Muir, Susannah Sample, Sabrina Brounts, Lauren Baker and Emily Binversie, Comparative Genetics Laboratory, UW School of Veterinary Medicine Genetic research in companion animals is a valuable means to understand the basis of disease, identify treatment targets and potentially identify at-risk animals. Advances in DNA sequencing methods are becoming more powerful and affordable, as is reflected in the rapid growth in scientific publications in this field and similarly in the consumer market, as direct-to-consumer genotyping continues to gain popularity. One Health is a collaborative trans-disciplinary approach to optimize health outcomes that recognizes the connection between public health and the health...

By Jodi Legge, Wisconsin Livestock Identification Consortium Executive Director The Wisconsin Livestock Identification Consortium (WLIC) was created in 2001 to manage and maintain a national animal identification system to facilitate speedy “trace back” and “trace forward” efforts in case of an animal disease outbreak. Wisconsin was the first state in the nation to mandate livestock premises registration and WLIC has an ongoing public-private partnership with the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) to implement and maintain the premises registration program. WLIC was already registering premises voluntarily when a BSE-infected dairy cow was discovered in Washington State in December 2003,...

By Dr. Gretchen May, Veterinary Program Manager, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection To strengthen the traceability of the livestock industry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is transitioning to 840 radio frequency identification (RFID) tags for official identification. This transition will occur over a period of three years and will result in better protection of the long-term health, marketability and economic viability of livestock. It also allows for better disease control management through faster information sharing. RFID tags have both a visual and an electronic component that consists of a 15-digit number, the first three of...

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